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  • Github commit process for non-committer changes? 403 permission error.

    I have a single small change I'd like to submit for integration into the master branch, against JIRA ROO-3083. Do I really need to fork a new branch? The instructions in the source readme.txt assume that you are a project committer I think. I use git version 1.7.10.msysgit.1. I set the global user.name and user.email, but that is for SSH rather than github.

    This looks correct:
    $ git remote -v
    origin https://github.com/SpringSource/spring-roo.git (fetch)
    origin https://github.com/SpringSource/spring-roo.git (push)

    I committed the changes locally, but on 'git push origin' I got:
    Username for 'https://github.com':
    Password for 'https://[email protected]':
    error: The requested URL returned error: 403 while accessing https://github.com/
    SpringSource/spring-roo.git/info/refs
    fatal: HTTP request failed

    Which means that I don't have rights to commit to the master branch, as expected, even though I typed the correct github user and password. I had hoped this would have shown up as a push request to be approved by a committer.

    Is it possible to create and submit a .patch file, like in SVN? Do I need to fork a branch and create a pull request, no matter how small the change? Or is there something else to be changed in the project configuration?

  • #2
    fork -> fix -> commit -> push -> create pull request

    The S2 guys aren't going to give you commit rights.. You can only commit in your own fork and from that have to create a pull request.

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    • #3
      Exactly! This is how I contributed my first patches to the project, see closed pull requests. Worked pretty smoothly.

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      • #4
        Yeah that's what I figured. The readme.txt file in the source root implies that you can push a simple change without having to create your own fork.

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