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  • What constitutes Application Health endpoint?

    Hi,

    I'm evaluating the Spring Insight console for my group. It is a grails web application where am I'm making standard HTTP requests through the front-end.
    I can see activity on the Trace History graph but I'm told that no endpoints exist under Application Health.
    So I'm wondering what rules apply for an endpoint to appear here?

    Thanks

  • #2
    In the current release, only Spring MVC @Controller methods show as endpoints. Grails controllers will not show.

    The next release will contain additional endpoint detection including Grails controllers and generic servlets. We are currently wrapping up development, look for it in January. Included in the upcoming release is fuller support for Grails applications and user defined operations/endpoints.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply.
      Is there any documentation that describes what criteria you have to meet to use the console effectively?
      For example, I was reading in another post that JDBC driver classes must be located in the application's lib folder to be able to trace database calls.
      How limited is the support for Grails presently? For example, I can't see any traces for these controllers in the other view either.

      Thanks.
      Last edited by spitbag; Dec 21st, 2009, 04:32 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by spitbag View Post
        Is there any documentation that describes what criteria you have to meet to use the console effectively?
        The documentation for the project is available at
        http://static.springsource.com/proje...ion/index.html

        Originally posted by spitbag View Post
        For example, I was reading in another post that JDBC driver classes must be located in the application's lib folder to be able to trace database calls.
        The documentation is a work in progress, just like Spring Insight. Please open a Jira for any issues or areas of enhancement.

        To answer your question, we utilize AspectJ weaving to instrument your application. To minimize the number of classes that need to be woven, we only advise the classes deployed with your application. This is why database calls will only appear if the jdbc driver is included in your war. We do not recommend you include the driver in a production application because it can lead to memory leaks. It is on our roadmap to address be we do not have a specific time slated.

        Originally posted by spitbag View Post
        How limited is the support for Grails presently? For example, I can't see any traces for these controllers in the other view either.
        I'm not sure what you mean by the "other view." You will see the web request and database queries under the Trace History in the Recent Activity tab. The Application Health tab is not currently able to show Grails endpoints. In general, what you see is what we support

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        • #5
          gallbladder disease

          Nexus makes use of an interesting Javascript widget library named ExtJS. ExtJS provides for a number of interesting UI widgets that allow for rich interaction like the drag-drop UI for adding repositories to a group and reordering the contents of a group.

          In the last few sections, you learned how to add a new custom repositories to a build in order to download artifacts which are not available in the Central Repository.

          If you were not using a repository manager, you would have added these repositories to the repository element of your project’s POM, or you would have asked all of your developers to modify ~/.m2/settings.xml to reference two new repositories. Instead, you used the Nexus repository manager to add the two repositories to the public group. If all of the developers are configured to point to the public group in Nexus, you can freely swap in new repositories without asking your developers to change local configuration, and you’ve gained a certain amount of control over which repositories are made available to your development team.

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