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  • Worthy books/papers

    Hi all,

    I'd like to initiate a topic on books, papers, etc, related to software architecture that you people have read and found worthy.

    For a start, I would recommend the book "Business Component Factory", by Peter Herzum and Oliver Sims. I found the book extremely interesting and thought-provoking, despite the fact that it does not mention Java (nor Spring! :wink

    Best regards,
    F.

  • #3
    I would like to suggest not to buy Sun's "Core J2EE Pattern" since it looks more like anti-pattern. It mostly deals with, how to sucessfully avoid the negative performance impacts caused by the EJBs. There are some usefull patterns, but they are rare and can be found anywhere else.

    Comment


    • #4
      Suggested readings

      Want to make my contribution

      -"Expert one-on-one J2EE Design and Development", R Johnson. Wiley, 2003
      -"Pattern-oriented Software Architecture, Vol 1", F Buschmann et al. Wiley, 1996
      -"Enterprise Integration Patterns", G Hohpe, B Woolf. Addison-Wesley, 2004

      Comment


      • #5
        Worthy books/papers

        While there has been more discussion of IoC or DI, the following weblog posts really cemented the idea for me, putting into a smalle brain sized morsel.

        C. Perez, Deconstructing Dependency Injection:
        http://www.manageability.org/blog/st...ency_injection

        Which refers to this brilliant post by R. Oberg:
        http://jroller.com/page/rickard/2004...on_and_open_vs

        (BTW, Oberg used Pico, I wonder if he looked at Spring).

        Perez writes: quote
        Components are actually runtime configurable entities. Our class-based bias blinds us to the fact that configuration can be a runtime activity and therefore part of an object's lifecycle. So in the beginning of a component's lifetime you have "allocation", "configuration" and then "discovery". end-quote

        --- J. Betancourt

        Comment


        • #6
          I hear Expert one-on-one J2EE Development without EJB is...

          I hear Expert one-on-one J2EE Development without EJB by Rod Johnson is good :shock:

          The book also has a section on recommended reading.
          • Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development
            Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture
            Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software
            Core J2EE Patterns 2nd Edition

          Comment


          • #7
            Books by Rod Johnson

            Hi all,

            I've read both "J2EE Design and Development" and "J2EE Development without EJB" of the expert one-on-one series by Rod Johnson. I think both books can be recommended without hesitation. Since the second one is more up-to-date on Spring than the first, it may be a better buy if acquiring both is inconvenient.

            These books show the thinking that led to the framework, so they are extremely useful to any developer using Spring. I didn't mention them on the first posting just because I thought it was going to be preaching to the converted.

            Best regards,
            F.

            Comment


            • #8
              Eric Evans, Domain Driven Design

              Eric Evans, Domain Driven Design. Truly excellent book on object modelling which focuses on the modelling, not the language features.

              Comment


              • #9
                Eric Evans, Domain Driven Design. Truly excellent book on object modelling which focuses on the modelling, not the language features.
                I just looked up from reading it to check my email. I agree, it's really good. So far, I'm about halfway through, thus I can't say how good exactly, but it's in the same league as the books by Martin Fowler and Robert Martin.

                Michael

                Comment


                • #10
                  I just bought Enterprise Service Bus by David Chappell. So far its very good.

                  ESB is a new buzz word, and it is mixing up a lot of stuff together, like SOA, MOM, etc., resulting in a 'internet' age EAI. However, so far it seems that it is more then just hype.

                  -- Josef Betancourt

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Re: Books by Rod Johnson

                    Originally posted by Fernando Olcoz
                    I've read {...} "J2EE Development without EJB" {...} can be recommended without hesitation. I didn't mention them on the first posting just because I thought it was going to be preaching to the converted.
                    Well, your preaching helped convince me to finally buy it, and holy cow, it's outstanding! I'll be spending a lot of time with this one...

                    Scott

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Re: Books by Rod Johnson

                      Originally posted by Fernando Olcoz
                      I've read both "J2EE Design and Development" and "J2EE Development without EJB" of the expert one-on-one series by Rod Johnson. I think both books can be recommended without hesitation. Since the second one is more up-to-date on Spring than the first, it may be a better buy if acquiring both is inconvenient.
                      If I had to buy just one, I'd pick "J2EE Design and Development". The theme of both books is pretty much identical, but I found "J2EE D&D" to be more technically detailed and thought provoking.

                      Erwin

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        If I had to buy just one, I'd pick "J2EE Design and Development"
                        I'd agree with the post above, but add that the books are complimentary. Get both, and certainly don't write off the first book thinking it's outdated.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          basic reading while waiting for your train: Design Patterns Explained: A New Perspective on Object-Oriented Design
                          by Alan Shalloway, James Trott
                          explains some nice ideas but verbose.

                          Software Architecture Design Patterns in Java by Partha Kuchana
                          http://www.crcpress.com/shopping_car...parent_id=&pc=

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            ESB?

                            More vendors are starting to adopt the ESB approach. BEA and IBM, both will make their app server do something with it. Not sure if its just marketecture or real stuff.

                            The only open-source project that I know of that does ESB is Mule. See http://www.muleumo.org/


                            Originally posted by jbetancourt
                            I just bought Enterprise Service Bus by David Chappell. So far its very good.

                            ESB is a new buzz word, and it is mixing up a lot of stuff together, like SOA, MOM, etc., resulting in a 'internet' age EAI. However, so far it seems that it is more then just hype.

                            -- Josef Betancourt

                            Comment

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